The importance of higher, intense Meditation

The importance of higher, intense Meditation

As you know, our cultures and societies are becoming more distracted and fond of escapism via external stimulation. Accordingly, you will find that modern spiritual and meditation techniques tend to make sacrifices, muting or discarding the lofty objectives declared in the ancient texts, slowing down progress, putting a ceiling on our endeavour.

Worse still is the creation a false belief that the outcome to be sought is a passive, one-with-everything stupor, from which nothing of importance can be realised or utilised in this world.

Meditation techniques are wide and varied. Some prioritise the emotional nature, some the intellect, but you will see that as you go back further and further through the millennia that eventually the two sides unite. There is a lucid and rational model of the psyche and the cosmos that harmonises all disparate and disconnected aspects.

You can start here. You can begin meditation in its deepest sense from the outset rather than wading through reams of new age confabulation.

It is through the techniques described in Vedanta and ancient Yoga that knowledge in its highest sense, and healing of the selves occurs. The vehicles of physical existence are purified and made sensitive, a stream of information from the object of your meditation comes into your awareness. You can select the object to be meditated upon, it can be something as simple as a task or problem in your life, something with which you are curious or fascinated, or if you find yourself with the time and capacity to tackle metaphysical or spiritual realms, you could choose an object like the nature of the manifested universe, the all pervading consciousness, or an image of the divine if you are so inclined.

This is how we accomplish the noble goals, the ideas that inspired teachers throughout human history have hinted at. This is how we make fundamental shifts in ourselves and the world. By redirecting our active extroversion into active introversion.

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